5 Ways to wellbeing during the age of Covid-19

It’s been a while since I have blogged, and given the unprecedented times that we live in, I thought I would blog to give some useful hints and tips on maintaining good mental health for those who are having to self-isolate during the COVID-19 aka Corona Virus pandemic.

Obviously, my first point that I want to make is that wherever you are in the world, avoid misinformation about the virus, and listen to advice from official health organisations in your country, or from organisations such as the World Health Organization (WHO). Assuming you have read up on COVID-19, and you are required to self-isolate, here are my suggestions for what to do at home over the coming weeks.

  1. Connect with people

Connecting with people when self-isolating might sound like an oxymoron, but it isn’t! Use social media, FaceTime, Skype, Zoom, WhatsApp or whatever non-face-to-face format you need to speak to friends and family, or work colleagues. Make time to have some daily contact with the ones you love and care about. Sometimes it might be worth planning ahead, and setting a specific time of day to connect each day to those that are closest to you. Also think about the people that are most vulnerable, such as those that you know that are older, or have long-term health conditions, or have other vulnerabilities.

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Also keep connected with the outside world, by keeping up to date with the news. Use respectable and trusted news outlets, either on-line or on the television. Remember that most supermarkets can do home deliveries if you need shopping, be it groceries, medications, or things to keep you entertained and to prevent bordom!

If you are self-isolating with others (e.g. family, or flatmates) and it is safe to do so, keep connected by switching off the television and enjoy games with each others.

2. Be physically active

Being physically active can be a challenge when stuck at home for several days at a time, but simple stretching exercises are one effective way to achieve this. Doing a minimum of 20 minutes per day would be advisable, but if you can do more, then go for it. Simple yoga could be a start, and if you are unsure how to go about this, there are a number of apps available or use Youtube. Depending on your fitness levels, there are other gentle exercises you might be able to do in the comfort of your own home, such as sit-ups, press-ups, etc. Other options could be to try the 30 day plank challenge (look on your usual App Store for details). If you can, give others who are self-isolating words of encouragement to keep active; it can be challenging to keep motivated when you are on your own, but giving each other encouragement, can help massively. Another option to keep active is to Spring Clean the house, now could be a good time to clean the nooks and crannies within your house that may get neglected normally. Choose one room each day to have a full clean, and bag up items that you no longer need or use ready to take to the recycling centres when the self-isolation period comes to an end. If you have a garden, can you mow the lawn, or weed a bed?

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3. Learn new skills

This could be the perfect time to learn something new, or to further your knowledge on an existing topic. An obvious start if you are stuck at home, is to try a new recipe. This could be a particularly good activity if you have children in the house, as it can be a good time for everyone to learn, and to socialise together. It is also a good opportunity to use food items at the back of the food cupboard that seldom get a look in. If you are stuck what to cook, the BBC have a good selection of recipes to try, and you can search by ingredient, meal type, cusine type etc.

You could try some new activity such as yoga (see above), or a new hobby such as learning to play an instrument, or some type of art such as drawing or painting (and if you don’t have a flute, guitar, paints or pencils to hand, don’t forget that you order on-line for home delivery). There are plenty of free or cheap online websites that can teach you new hobbies, just use the internet search engines, or go to you App Store. If you have access to LinkedIn Learning, there are multiple online courses that you can try on there including guitar lessons!

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4. Give to others

With your new hobby or extra skill, now is the chance to give to others. Could you write a poem for a loved one, make a cake for your housemates?

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If you are not someone who is self-isolating, but know people that are, can you volunteer to get them some groceries, or take their dog for a walk? Can you volunteer at the local food back?

5. Pay attention

Mindfulness could be very helpful for you right now. Paying attention to how you are feeling, and learning to relax will be very helpful as we go through self-isolation. There are a multitude of mindfulness apps available, Headspace is probably the most well known, but there are others. The NHS has some useful information on mindfulness that can be found here.

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Final thoughts

Remember, that this is a pandemic, but it will come to an end, and life will eventually get back to normal. Keep following the updates on nationally television to see if expert advice changes (and it may change as new information about the virus comes to light). Stay safe, stay well. Remember to keep a look out for vulnerable people in your neighbourhood and your community.