Third and final leg of the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust ride

Assuming I make it to day 3 and haven’t fallen by the wayside, this is my planned route for the final day. It also happens to be the shortest day at a mere 36.5 miles. It also has the least hill climbs too; which is probably a blessing at this stage, I am pretty sure the accumulation of the previous two days riding will be taking its toll by now. That all said, I am hoping that by the last day, I will have reached or surpassed by target fundraising of £500. If you haven’t donated, and would like to do so, (think about giving a couple of pounds, and skipping a coffee this week), then please go to my TotalGiving webpage to find out how you can donate, and remember if you are a UK resident, don’t forget to tick the GiftAid box, which will cost you nothing, but the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust will get some extra cash to help with suicide prevention.

Okay, so the plan on the final day of the charity ride will start off with me filled up with as hearty a breakfast as I can get. I will have burnt up a serious amount of calories by now, and I will need all the energy I can muster for this final stretch. Starting off in Sheriff Hutton, I head east of north-east towards the beautiful market town of Malton. I head up a pretty steep but short hill-climb, before passing through the village of Bulmer. Shortly after passing Bulmer, I head north for short distance (I think this was to avoid a fairly steep climb, but can’t remember), passing the amazing Castle Howard before turning east through Coneyshorpe. Still heading east, I come to Malton. I love Malton, it holds a lot of special memories for me. I might stop here for a little break, get some tea and cake! The town has a market, bars, and shops, so I should be spoilt for choice.

The final day

Once I get to Malton, the next 20 miles or so, are relatively flat, which will be very welcomed. I cross over the River Derwent, into the neighbouring town of Norton-on-Derwent, heading east before I skirt around the village of Scagglethorpe (there are lots of villages with the name “Thorpe” in it, I think it is Old English or Viking for “cluster of houses – any history buffs reading this, will you let me know if I am correct?). Next little village is Rillington, and shortly after passing through there, I take a north-east route through Yedingham, and back over the River Derwent.

I then come to territory I know very well, in the Vale of Pickering, and skirting around and partly through the North Yorkshire Moors National Park. I spent many childhood family holidays here, and have been a few times with my son, in the quest to find fossils. The first large village I come to is Snainton, and I may well stop here for lunch. Snainton and the surrounding area is well my great-great grandmother’s side of the family came from (I also think it is where Patrick Stewart of Star Trek fame is from). The road I follow, is pretty much the same road all the way to my final destination of Scarborough.

From Snainton, I pass the little picturesque village of Brompton, Ruston, Wykeham, West Ayton, I skim around East Ayton, and take my final hill climb (only a few hundred feet, but it will be pretty gruelling by this point). I’ve yet to decide, but I think I will go to the Harbour, take a photo of the end of my journey, take my bike to the place I am staying overnight, and then head to the Harbour Bar (it does shut at 5.30pm, so I am hoping I make it in time). The Harbour Bar is an old ice cream parlour that hasn’t changed much since the 1950s (although the family have been making ice cream since the 1930s I think). I am hoping to get a full-fat ice cream sundae!

Second leg of the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust ride

Following on from my previous post on the First Leg of the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust Ride, I thought I would give a quick overview of the second leg of the ride. I am expecting this to be a very tough day. I will be physically tired from the previous day, and I am not expecting anyone to ride with me on this section, so psychologically it will be challenging too. For most of the second leg, I will be travelling through the Yorkshire Dales National Park, (think Brontes, Emmerdale, and James Herriot).

Initially starting off by heading south-east from Burnsall, I will come to the picturesque village of Appletreewick, which is only small, but apparently very popular with hikers and cyclists. From there I climb up a very steep hill to move out of Wharfdale, to reach the highest point of the whole journey (and I will have as my mantra that, “I am raising money for the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust!“). Then, I go down a very steep and scary hill (1300ft, to 400ft in the space of about 2 miles – I hope my brakes work well), into the River Nidd valley, and to the larger village of Pateley Bridge. I know of Pateley Bridge, but have never been there (to my knowledge). Once over the River Nidd there is steep 200ft ride out of the valley via the village of Glasshouses heading north, for one more big hill climb, before changing to a easterly direction.

Other than a few farmsteads and hamlets, I don’t see much in the way of civilisation until I come to a small village called Markington, and it does have a small pub/inn, which might be a welcome rest (for a non-alcohol beverage and a bite to eat). It will be just shy of halfway through the second leg, so once fed and energised I will be back on the bike. It will be pretty much a flat ride for the second half. Next village will be Bishop Monkton, and shortly after that I will be following the River Ure for a short while, coming to another little village called Roecliffe.

A little further east, I come to the small market town of Boroughbridge. This could be a good opportunity to have a break, and stock up on provisions. Boroughbridge has the A1 trunk road bypass it, and it is roughly midway between London and Edinburgh. I also cross the River Ure at this point. Having travelled briefly north, I head east once more, and come to a small village called Raskelf. Another little market town called Easingwold is my next significant bit of civilisation that I come to. I pass by a couple more small villages, and have a little hill climb before I reach my second days destination of Sheriff Hutton. It is a very old village (mentioned in the Doomsday Book), and has a ruined castle. It also has two very good pubs (I am led to believe), which is probably where I will dine, and try and recovery!! I may celebrate with a cheeky 1/2 pint of Mild, and use a Cameron Coaster to rest it on! I am still open to sponsor money if you have a few quid spare for this worthy cause. Please click on my TotalGiving page to find out how you can donate, and if you are a UK resident, do consider the the GiftAid donation at no extra cost to you.

First leg of the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust ride

I thought I would give a little overview of the planned route for the 1st leg. This is a bit of up hill and down dale (as they say in Yorkshire). Starting off at the Eric Morecambe statue in (you guessed it), Morecambe, it is a very easy first few miles. I know the ten or so miles very well, as I have cycled in both directions plenty of times. It starts on Morecambe Promenade for a few hundred yards, before a small stretch of road takes you to Morecambe train station. From there, I will be travelling along the old railway track, that is now a mixed pedestrian and cycling route for around ten miles, taking me to the ancient small city of Lancaster. Remaining on the old railway line, I follow the River Lune, past Halton’s old railway station (now used as Lancaster University’s rowing club, clubhouse), past the beauty spot of the Crook O’Lune by the village of Caton. Shortly after Caton the cycle track comes to an end at Bull Beck picnic site.

The Crook O’Lune on a grey day

Then the journey starts to get a little uncharted for me. I know the villages and towns for a little more of the journey pretty well, but I don’t know many of the little country lanes I will be travelling on that Komoot has recommended. I know the main trunk road that takes me north-east from Caton to Wray, but then the little lane that takes me east out of Wray is unbeknown to me. It is also here that the hill climb starts. There is a nice little tearoom in Wray, so it might be a timely stop to get a quick sugar fix, as there few and far between villages of any decent size, so shops and cafes will be a rare sight. Below you should see the route on Komoot, embedded (if the technology works) into my blog!

It is pretty much one big hill climb from here, riding along the River Hindburn for a while, before going the River Wenning valley, on the other side from Low and High Bentham. I criss-cross the Morecambe to Leeds railway line four or five times as I approach, but avoid Giggleswick and Settle (I deviated the Komoot suggested route, to avoid a killer of a hill climb).

Photo of the River Wenning taken from the train as it crosses one dreary morning in March 2019

It is here that I meet the River Ribble as it head south towards Preston. After approximately 15 miles of leaving Wray, I come to the next village (although I will have passed a few hamlets), Rathmall. If I am honest, I had never heard of it (sorry Rathmallians), where I hit a flurry of other villages, including Wigglesworth (I promise I am not making these names up). The first real town (although technically a large village) of any description is next, which is Hellifield. I am not sure if I will have stopped for lunch before now, but if not, this could be a good spot.

Heading north-east out of Hellifield, I cross the River Aire valley, before facing my first big steep climb, through Cracoe, and into the River Wharfe valley and reaching my first overnight stop at the picturesque village of Burnsall. I am going to need all the rest I can get, as the next morning for my second leg, I have one huge hill climb (if I stick to the suggested Komoot route).

The Komoot route of my Cameron Grant Memorial Trust Morecambe to Scarborough cycle ride

The 50 to 75 mile section looks, erm, interesting!

So here it is, the route for anyone interested in seeing where I am going, how steep the hill climbs are, which villages I will be passing through, etc. For those of you with a bicycle, if you want to share part or all of the journey with me, do get in touch, and I can give you dates, and estimates of where I will be at different times of the day. For those of you who would like to sponsor me to help raise funds for the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust, my TotalGiving page is now up and running.

As you can see above, the total distance is 135 miles. Apparently, it will only take 15 hours and 53 minutes, if I average 8.5mph (this is based on “average” fitness). There are some significant hill climbs, and they will be a real challenge, especially with accumlative days of riding, and having aches from the day before!

I have used Komoot to set the route. For those of you unfamiliar with Komoot, it is basically a satnav for cyclists. It’s very good as it can even set routes for mountain bikers. You can set your starting point, set your end point, and what type of cycling you are doing (e.g. touring, road race, MTB, etc.) and it plans your route for you. There are also options to edit the route manually.

I’ve got my accommodation booked, but I am looking for suggested places to stop and eat for lunch. If you know any cycling friendly cafes or pubs on route, let me know in the comments section on this blog. Also, do you have any recommendations of snacks to take for along the way?

Project planning – (Part 1) Scoping

Don’t worry, no Gantt Charts here (although I did consider using them at one time). I thought it might be useful to give you an idea of how I have planned my route to date. In this post, I will show you the routes I considered and opted for, the accommodation I plan to stay in overnight, and what tech and gear I will be taking with me.

The route. Straightaway I decided upon the Way of the Roses route (or a variation of the said route. The first reason is that I live close to the traditional starting point of the Eric Morecambe statue in Morecambe. It takes about 20 minutes for me to cycle to the starting point, and then I have to almost double back on myself. I am about 95% sure of the route I definitely want to take, I am still deciding on a particular stretch in the middle of the Yorkshire Dales – the dilemma being, do I go on quieter roads, but with much steeper hills climbs, ongoing on trunk roads that are a little flatter but with busy and faster motorised traffic? The initial few miles are straightforward; along an old railway track that has been converted to a footpath and cycle route, that heads west out of Morecambe to Lancaster and a few miles beyond along the River Lune valley. From there it is an assortment of country lanes, B roads, and A roads into Yorkshire, and the Dales. This is where I am yet to finalise the route, but the third section will take me through or near Skipton, Ilkley, Harrogate, York, Malton, Pickering, and the Scarborough. I am using Komoot to plan the route. It’s basically an online route planner for cyclists.

I initially considered camping along the route, but having spoken to a few people, they have swayed me more into thinking about staying in Pubs, youth hostels, or B&Bs. There are some positives to camping, such as being less restricted to when/where you stop – so if you are making good progress, keep going, or if you are getting tired, stop and pitch up. The downsides are of course more obvious, not great after a hard day in the saddle of then having to put up a tent, weather can be a challenge (too hot, too cold, too wet, too windy), and also the additional weight that you have to carry on your bike. I haven’t completely ruled out camping, but I think I would want to have a mini practice run of camping somewhere close to home that I can cycle to, and have an overnight stay in. For those of you interested in camping with a bicycle, then I can strongly recommend looking at Jon and Franks cycle touring webpages. I got some great tips for gear from there, and also things to consider such as distance per day, etc.

One of the things that became apparent fairly early on through discussions with those who had undertaken long-distance cycle routes is the type of bicycle makes a big difference. This, of course, is obvious – you wouldn’t want to cycle on a traditional shopper bicycle or a BMX for example on a long distance route (unless you were looking to show off)! It is possible on a mountain bike, but not ideal. Of course, I have a hardtail MTB, and it does have a pannier rack on it already. I also had a very old hardtail that was becoming a bit of a rust bucket has not had much use out of it in 15 years. At the beginning of 2019, Wheelbase had a great offer where you could trade in any old bicycle in any condition, and they gave a significant discount on a new bike.

Choosing which bike became another dilemma. There are so many bicycles out there it is hard for a novice like me to work out the best options. However, the internet is a brilliant invention, and I read review after review after review. Getting unbiased reviews (e.g. reviewers who haven’t been given freebies) is a challenge, but a challenge that I worked my way through. I didn’t want to get a bike that I was only going to use just for the C2C (and I had seen bicycles on eBay that were being sold after just 200 miles use). I decided that I wanted something that would be good to commute to work (so pannier racks needed – which would also be needed for the C2C), go for pleasure rides with my son (something that could go on road, as well as canal towpaths, bridleways etc.), and something that be great for camping trips for in the future. This narrowed down the field to either a strong touring road bicycle or an adventure bike. Further advice was sought, and I narrowed my choices down to two or three. I got the chance to test out two and opted for the Trek 920. It’s very light for the class of bike, it has front and rear pannier racks as standard, 6 drink bottle holder mounting points (although that seems excessive to me), it looks like a hybrid meets road bicycle, which makes it great for the shorter rides I do with my son, and I found it a very comfortable ride. I’ll no doubt be writing further about this bike in future posts.

In terms of other gear that I have bought for the trip, but will no doubt use in other ways have included Ortlieb Back Roller Plus and Ortlieb Sport Roller Front panniers. In part, I got these for the trip, but also for my commutes to work. They are waterproof, quick and easy to mount, and have very good ratings on many review sites. They were also mentioned on Jon and Franks website (see above). They are not the cheapest panniers, but if you shop around, you may get some during the sales (I got my front panniers with 33% off the RRP through a New Year sale).

When I finalise my plans, I’ll post again. I’ll also post more about the equipment I use. If you’ve any recommendations on tech or equipment recommendations, let me know.