Strava v’s Cyclemeter

Now that the days are getting longer, I have decided to go for some after work rides. This is really helping with my 5 Ways to Wellbeing and the Be Active component of that. If I am to get fit enough for the Coast to Coast charity ride, every practice mile will really count for the big event and help raise more money for the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust. If you haven’t donated and you want to give a fiver, tenner, or more, please go to my Total Giving page. Remember, if you are a UK resident, you can include Gift Aid, which costs you, the sponsor nothing to do, but increases the money for the charity. That’s also the great thing about Total Giving, it is a non-profit organisation, so everything you donate, will go towards suicide prevention and mental health awareness.

To kick off these early evening rides, I went straight home after work, fed the dog, and got changed into some cycling gear. I went out after work today. I didn’t plan my route, (which in hindsight, is not always a good thing – I got a little lost, but soon found myself in recognisable territory). However, I decided I wanted about 60 – 90 minutes, so I could get back, and have dinner without it being too late into the evening.

As mentioned in previous posts, I have used Strava and Cyclemeter for a while now, but never done much other to clock how many miles I have been, and get sadly excited about the speeds I have managed to achieve (or in most cases thought to myself “Seriously? I thought I was going waaaaay quicker than that!“). Both Strava and Cyclemeter can also be used for runners, joggers and walkers, (although there are other apps that are possibly more suited for those activities).

Let’s start off with Cyclemeter. It’s the app for cycling I have had the longest. I find it has a lot more detail in it that Strava and other apps that I have used, but no longer have on my phone. Abvio, who are the makers of Cyclemeter claims to be the most advanced cycle app, and to a novice like me, it certainly appears that way. Let’s have a look at my ride this evening.

This evening’s ride. Screenshot of Cyclemeter app

Unless you are local, you won’t know the terrain etc. It was a mixture of city streets, cycle tracks, an old Victorian promenade along the coast, canal paths, and quiet country roads. You can also see that it was sunny, and just over 16 miles in total. The squiggle between 11 and 12 miles is where I got a little lost, trying to get onto the canal!

Cyclemeter overview of the speeds (e.g. fastest, average, etc.)

Cyclemeter, like Strava gives you an overview of the speed you travelled on route. I don’t know if I will eventually get used to seeing 30+ miles per hour as being 30+ miles per hour. I always feel at the time, that anything over 30 miles per hour, is like the speed of light! The fastest I have achieved before now (according to Cyclemeter) is 42 miles per hour.

If you live in Lancaster, you will be used to hills!

Depending on which side of the River Lune you live on in Lancaster, you are guaranteed hills! The further north or east you go, the hillier it gets. However, as you can see, nearly half the ride was along the coast.

Cadence – it’s like Quantum Physics to me!

The app (if you have a ANT+ or Bluetooth cadence measurer on you bike set up – my bicycle has a Bontrager one built into the frame) can also let you know your RPM. But that at the moment is as much as I know what this section of the app is all about. I have no idea if my cadence is any good or not, or what to do with the reading (if any cyclists are reading this, do let me know if my cadence is good, bad, or indifferent)!

Cyclemeter’s little summary page

Each ride you do with Cyclemeter results in a 13 page report. The above screenshots are just a few examples. There are some that really aren’t worth that while (I don’t personally think). For example one page summarises what music you listened to, whilst on your ride. If you have a heart rate monitor, there is a report page for that too. The above screenshot is the summary page

How does Cyclemeter compare with Strava? Well, I find Strava fun, but less informative.

Strava homepage of the route

Like Cyclemeter, Strava shows the route you completed, but without the mile markers on the home page. What is interesting is that Strava thinks my average speed was 0.30 mph slower, by 7 rpm faster on my cadence. Which one is telling porkies?

The fun stuff

I quite like the little medal you can get for regular stretches that you might ride. Basically stretches of road or cycleways get given nicknames by the Strava community (it has a social media aspect to it). Some names are more imaginative than others; Dead Man’s Prolapse being one of my favourites. When I’m in the mood it does make me want to push a little harder to get a PB (personal best).

Elevation review on Strava

Like Cyclemeter, Strava reviews your elevation. Interestingly, Strava and Cyclemeter differ slightly on how much elevation I actually did on this ride!

Speed merchant (or not) on Strava

Final screenshot is of Strava’s analysis of this evenings ride. Interesting that Strava thinks I did 3 mph faster than my fastest time according to Cyclemeter. Maybe I should average the two?

I think I’ll continue to use both apps, as they each give me something a little different. I’m certainly going to use them for the C2C ride. On my current phone, I’ve got a good data allowance and battery life is sweet, so I don’t have to worry about being drained of either battery or data.

If you use either of the apps or have others to recommend, do let me know.

My cycle kit. What I will be using for my C2C ride. (Part 1)

I thought that there will be some cycle geeks who will be interested in what bicycle I will be using for my Coast to Coast ride. I think, this is the seventh bicycle I’ve owned since I was a child. It’s a Trek 920. I also have a MTB, but I don’t fancy riding 135 miles of road on that!

My Trek 920. Without a doubt the best bike I’ve ever had

The 920 is a workhorse of a bike, yet light as a feather (or under 13kg to be a little more precise). Its frame is aluminium alloy and comes with tubeless ready Bontrager Duster Elite 29er wheels. I am planning to replace tyres, as they are a bit too grippy for what I need, (although last weekend the current tyres were useful, as I went for a ride along a canal and the path in parts was muddy grass). It comes with very sturdy rear and front pannier racks. The combined maximum weight it can carry (bicycle, rider, and cargo) is 136kg. I am 80kg, and the bike is 13kg, which leaves me with a whomping 43kg worth of gear I can carry (although that is never going to happen)! Additional to the racks, there are also 6 water-bottle mounts (yes, 6 is not a typo).

It comes with SRAM S700 shifters, 10-speed gears. This is the first bike I’ve had with SRAM tap shifters, and they have taken a little bit of getting used to. However, I have travelled around 200 miles now on the bike, and I am just about there with gear changing. This is also the first bike I’ve had with hydraulic disc brakes. I was alarmed when I first went out on it, as the brakes hardly worked. I thought I was doing something wrong, however, where I purchased my bicycle from, had swopped over the left brake with the right brake to make it more in line with the UK braking system (the bike had to be shipped in from mainland Europe – where the brakes are on the opposite side from what we are used to in the UK). This had caused air bubbles to get trapped in the braking fluid (some of you more technical types will be able to explain this far better than I can), causing the brakes not to function too well. However, the bike has been back to the shop, and it is all fixed now!

The one tap system has taken a little getting used to

The bike didn’t come with mudguards (fenders), although there are mounting points for full guards, nor did it come with pedals. For mudguards, I opted for Planet Bike Cascadia Fenders 29″ x 65mm. They were easy to install. The only downside to them is that they don’t have any hi-viz elements to them unlike some other mudguards that I had seen, however, they did come highly recommend on various websites, including Adventure Bike Touring who happened to write about the older version of the Trek 920. As for the pedals, I took the plunge, I have finally gone clipless! I got myself a bargain in the January sales, with Nukeproof Horizon CS CrMo Trail pedals. They (as would any clipless pedal) took some getting used to. Thankfully, YouTube gave me plenty of hints and tips. I’ve only had one embarrassing moment when at a junction, I forgot to clip out and fell sideways. Thankfully for me (but not my son), I was riding with my boy, and he cushioned the blow for me!

As for the extras. Well as you can see, I have added a horn/light on the handlebars. It is a Hornit, claims to be the loudest mass-produced bicycle horn available. And it is loud. Very loud. The problem I have encountered though is that people (pedestrians, car users, other cyclists) don’t recognise it as a bicycle horn (it sounds more like a car alarm), so no one moves out of the way! For that reason, it is the only item in this blog that I wouldn’t recommend. However, the light is pretty good, certainly good enough for commuters. I have a small Oxford alarmed D-lock. It’s just big enough to go through the frame, and loop around most bicycle shelter stands, as well as through a long reinforced bicycle cable that I carry to loop through the two wheels. The alarm is very loud, and would make a bike thief have second thoughts of robbing me of my pride and joy. I have also mounted a few bottle cages on. The black bottle is actually a handy little container for tools. If you read the reviews for the bottle/tool container, a lot of people complain that everything inside rattles (tools, tyre levers, etc.), however, I stuff a few disposable latex gloves in and that stops things moving inside, plus keeps my hands clean if and when my chain comes off or tyres need replacing on the roadside. Another cool little gizmo is the Quadlock. Easy to install, and basically is a mount for a smartphone. Given how much I use Cyclemeter and Strava, and have a TomTom Bandit camera mounted to my helmet (but it can be turned off and on from my phone); Quadlock is a handy little kit.

Elite Tool Carrier and Elite Bottle Cage

Part 2 will focus on the panniers and their contents.