Hills! Cycling up them is an art form

It’s a month away before my coast to coast ride for charity. I’m trying to get over the two psychological blocks that I have, that I am going to have to overcome by the time I do the Coast to Coast ride for the Cameron Grant Memorial Trust (by the way, there is still time to sponsor me if you would like, even if it is just £1.00, click over to my TotalGiving page). The two blocks are:

  1. Steep hill climbs (I’ve done long steady climbs, but nothing too vertical!
  2. The accumulative effect of cycling two long rides in two days

Now, some of you will laugh, but for me, it’s all about small steps (or should I say, short revolutions?). My ride yesterday was the hiller of the two. 1848ft elevation gain, and was just shy of 24 miles. Today’s ride was a much flatter, at only 953ft elevation gain, and a little shorter at 21.29 miles.

The two pictures above are screen shots from the route from Strava and Cyclmeter. As you can see from Strava the weather was pretty good. The only let down was the cross wind between the 19th and 20th mile, as I was dropping down fast into Quernmore from Jubilee Tower. The first 13 miles are mainly flat, but the roads are busy, as you head towards the Forest of Bowland, (an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), the hills come thick and fast, although the roads are much quieter. What I did notice about this ride, it that I seem to have got the hang of hydration much better than previous longer rides.

Pretty much the highest point on the first ride, is Jubilee Tower. The tower is a little folly standing 950ft above sea level. It was built by a local wealthy business man for Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee (1887). However, it is now owned by Lancashire County Council, and there is car park next to it. It is a popular spot for cyclists to take a little break from the hills climb (I took the easier route, but it was still a challenge for me). For once, the sky was blue, and the views were excellent. Visible to the naked eye was Blackpool Tower, the Lake District Fells, and the Trough of Bowland. I stopped for a few minutes to take in the view, get my breath back, sup some water, and eat a little energy bar. But I was chuffed that no pushing of the bike happened – I am at last getting the knack of using gears (although by no means perfect yet). When I got home, I was physically tired, but feeling of great satisfaction. Cycling has been really beneficial for my mood as well as my body.

Today’s ride was more a psychological challenge. I woke up still a bit achy from the ride yesterday, and part of me just wanted to roll over and have an hour or so extra, in bed. However, I knew that wouldn’t cut it on the coast to coast ride. As you can see above, much of the ride was flat! But then, for much of the ride I was cycling along Morecambe Promenade, and along the Lancaster canal towpath – both great for cycling along, and indeed, parts of the Prom was rammed with cycling clubs on their Sunday rides. However, once I got Carnforth and on the country roads, it was quiet. So very quiet. I stopped for a few minutes to pick up an ink cartridge for the home printer (only annoyingly to find out, I had got the wrong one when I got home). This was a great ride, as I ended up on lanes that I had never been on before, as a cyclist or a motorist. It made me think more about the whole 5 Ways to Wellbeing, and the take notice aspect. I was going to stop and take photos, but I decided to live in the moment for once, and just appreciate everything that I could see.

The next step is to do a whole days ride. Of the 3 days cycling on the C2C, at least one day is 50+ miles, with some big climbs involved. I am going to plan a route using Komoot that will take me from home, over towards the Yorkshire Dales and back in a nice loop (I am not a fan of cycling to somewhere, and using the same route back – unless it is my commute to work, but even then, I sometimes mix it up a little).

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