My cycle kit. What I will be using for my C2C ride. (Part 1)

I thought that there will be some cycle geeks who will be interested in what bicycle I will be using for my Coast to Coast ride. I think, this is the seventh bicycle I’ve owned since I was a child. It’s a Trek 920. I also have a MTB, but I don’t fancy riding 135 miles of road on that!

My Trek 920. Without a doubt the best bike I’ve ever had

The 920 is a workhorse of a bike, yet light as a feather (or under 13kg to be a little more precise). Its frame is aluminium alloy and comes with tubeless ready Bontrager Duster Elite 29er wheels. I am planning to replace tyres, as they are a bit too grippy for what I need, (although last weekend the current tyres were useful, as I went for a ride along a canal and the path in parts was muddy grass). It comes with very sturdy rear and front pannier racks. The combined maximum weight it can carry (bicycle, rider, and cargo) is 136kg. I am 80kg, and the bike is 13kg, which leaves me with a whomping 43kg worth of gear I can carry (although that is never going to happen)! Additional to the racks, there are also 6 water-bottle mounts (yes, 6 is not a typo).

It comes with SRAM S700 shifters, 10-speed gears. This is the first bike I’ve had with SRAM tap shifters, and they have taken a little bit of getting used to. However, I have travelled around 200 miles now on the bike, and I am just about there with gear changing. This is also the first bike I’ve had with hydraulic disc brakes. I was alarmed when I first went out on it, as the brakes hardly worked. I thought I was doing something wrong, however, where I purchased my bicycle from, had swopped over the left brake with the right brake to make it more in line with the UK braking system (the bike had to be shipped in from mainland Europe – where the brakes are on the opposite side from what we are used to in the UK). This had caused air bubbles to get trapped in the braking fluid (some of you more technical types will be able to explain this far better than I can), causing the brakes not to function too well. However, the bike has been back to the shop, and it is all fixed now!

The one tap system has taken a little getting used to

The bike didn’t come with mudguards (fenders), although there are mounting points for full guards, nor did it come with pedals. For mudguards, I opted for Planet Bike Cascadia Fenders 29″ x 65mm. They were easy to install. The only downside to them is that they don’t have any hi-viz elements to them unlike some other mudguards that I had seen, however, they did come highly recommend on various websites, including Adventure Bike Touring who happened to write about the older version of the Trek 920. As for the pedals, I took the plunge, I have finally gone clipless! I got myself a bargain in the January sales, with Nukeproof Horizon CS CrMo Trail pedals. They (as would any clipless pedal) took some getting used to. Thankfully, YouTube gave me plenty of hints and tips. I’ve only had one embarrassing moment when at a junction, I forgot to clip out and fell sideways. Thankfully for me (but not my son), I was riding with my boy, and he cushioned the blow for me!

As for the extras. Well as you can see, I have added a horn/light on the handlebars. It is a Hornit, claims to be the loudest mass-produced bicycle horn available. And it is loud. Very loud. The problem I have encountered though is that people (pedestrians, car users, other cyclists) don’t recognise it as a bicycle horn (it sounds more like a car alarm), so no one moves out of the way! For that reason, it is the only item in this blog that I wouldn’t recommend. However, the light is pretty good, certainly good enough for commuters. I have a small Oxford alarmed D-lock. It’s just big enough to go through the frame, and loop around most bicycle shelter stands, as well as through a long reinforced bicycle cable that I carry to loop through the two wheels. The alarm is very loud, and would make a bike thief have second thoughts of robbing me of my pride and joy. I have also mounted a few bottle cages on. The black bottle is actually a handy little container for tools. If you read the reviews for the bottle/tool container, a lot of people complain that everything inside rattles (tools, tyre levers, etc.), however, I stuff a few disposable latex gloves in and that stops things moving inside, plus keeps my hands clean if and when my chain comes off or tyres need replacing on the roadside. Another cool little gizmo is the Quadlock. Easy to install, and basically is a mount for a smartphone. Given how much I use Cyclemeter and Strava, and have a TomTom Bandit camera mounted to my helmet (but it can be turned off and on from my phone); Quadlock is a handy little kit.

Elite Tool Carrier and Elite Bottle Cage

Part 2 will focus on the panniers and their contents.

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