Project planning – (Part 1) Scoping

Don’t worry, no Gantt Charts here (although I did consider using them at one time). I thought it might be useful to give you an idea of how I have planned my route to date. In this post, I will show you the routes I considered and opted for, the accommodation I plan to stay in overnight, and what tech and gear I will be taking with me.

The route. Straightaway I decided upon the Way of the Roses route (or a variation of the said route. The first reason is that I live close to the traditional starting point of the Eric Morecambe statue in Morecambe. It takes about 20 minutes for me to cycle to the starting point, and then I have to almost double back on myself. I am about 95% sure of the route I definitely want to take, I am still deciding on a particular stretch in the middle of the Yorkshire Dales – the dilemma being, do I go on quieter roads, but with much steeper hills climbs, ongoing on trunk roads that are a little flatter but with busy and faster motorised traffic? The initial few miles are straightforward; along an old railway track that has been converted to a footpath and cycle route, that heads west out of Morecambe to Lancaster and a few miles beyond along the River Lune valley. From there it is an assortment of country lanes, B roads, and A roads into Yorkshire, and the Dales. This is where I am yet to finalise the route, but the third section will take me through or near Skipton, Ilkley, Harrogate, York, Malton, Pickering, and the Scarborough. I am using Komoot to plan the route. It’s basically an online route planner for cyclists.

I initially considered camping along the route, but having spoken to a few people, they have swayed me more into thinking about staying in Pubs, youth hostels, or B&Bs. There are some positives to camping, such as being less restricted to when/where you stop – so if you are making good progress, keep going, or if you are getting tired, stop and pitch up. The downsides are of course more obvious, not great after a hard day in the saddle of then having to put up a tent, weather can be a challenge (too hot, too cold, too wet, too windy), and also the additional weight that you have to carry on your bike. I haven’t completely ruled out camping, but I think I would want to have a mini practice run of camping somewhere close to home that I can cycle to, and have an overnight stay in. For those of you interested in camping with a bicycle, then I can strongly recommend looking at Jon and Franks cycle touring webpages. I got some great tips for gear from there, and also things to consider such as distance per day, etc.

One of the things that became apparent fairly early on through discussions with those who had undertaken long-distance cycle routes is the type of bicycle makes a big difference. This, of course, is obvious – you wouldn’t want to cycle on a traditional shopper bicycle or a BMX for example on a long distance route (unless you were looking to show off)! It is possible on a mountain bike, but not ideal. Of course, I have a hardtail MTB, and it does have a pannier rack on it already. I also had a very old hardtail that was becoming a bit of a rust bucket has not had much use out of it in 15 years. At the beginning of 2019, Wheelbase had a great offer where you could trade in any old bicycle in any condition, and they gave a significant discount on a new bike.

Choosing which bike became another dilemma. There are so many bicycles out there it is hard for a novice like me to work out the best options. However, the internet is a brilliant invention, and I read review after review after review. Getting unbiased reviews (e.g. reviewers who haven’t been given freebies) is a challenge, but a challenge that I worked my way through. I didn’t want to get a bike that I was only going to use just for the C2C (and I had seen bicycles on eBay that were being sold after just 200 miles use). I decided that I wanted something that would be good to commute to work (so pannier racks needed – which would also be needed for the C2C), go for pleasure rides with my son (something that could go on road, as well as canal towpaths, bridleways etc.), and something that be great for camping trips for in the future. This narrowed down the field to either a strong touring road bicycle or an adventure bike. Further advice was sought, and I narrowed my choices down to two or three. I got the chance to test out two and opted for the Trek 920. It’s very light for the class of bike, it has front and rear pannier racks as standard, 6 drink bottle holder mounting points (although that seems excessive to me), it looks like a hybrid meets road bicycle, which makes it great for the shorter rides I do with my son, and I found it a very comfortable ride. I’ll no doubt be writing further about this bike in future posts.

In terms of other gear that I have bought for the trip, but will no doubt use in other ways have included Ortlieb Back Roller Plus and Ortlieb Sport Roller Front panniers. In part, I got these for the trip, but also for my commutes to work. They are waterproof, quick and easy to mount, and have very good ratings on many review sites. They were also mentioned on Jon and Franks website (see above). They are not the cheapest panniers, but if you shop around, you may get some during the sales (I got my front panniers with 33% off the RRP through a New Year sale).

When I finalise my plans, I’ll post again. I’ll also post more about the equipment I use. If you’ve any recommendations on tech or equipment recommendations, let me know.

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